Post-conquest developments in the Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico
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Post-conquest developments in the Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico the early colonial obsidian industry by Pamela J. Cressey

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Published by Museum of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colo .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Obsidian -- Mexico -- Mexico, Valley of.,
  • Indians of Mexico -- Implements.,
  • Mexico, Valley of (Mexico) -- Antiquities.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Pamela J. Cressey.
SeriesOccasional publications in Mesoamerican anthropology ; no. 8, Katunob, occasional publications in Mesoamerican anthropology -- no. 8.
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 149 leaves :
Number of Pages149
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21923233M

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  The main buildings of Teotihuacan are connected by the Avenue of the Dead (or Miccaotli in the Aztec language Nahuatl). The Avenue of the Dead is a foot- . b Post-Conquest developments in the Teotihuacan valley, Mexico; Part 1: Excava? tions. Office of the State Archaeologist, Report 5. Iowa City. a The implications of Post-Conquest archae? ology for method and theory in Pre-Conquest research in the Valley of Mexico. Paper. Post-Conquest Developments in The Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico Part 1. Excavations Report 5. Used. Post-Conquest Developments in The Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico Part 1. Excavations Report 5. Print on Demand. Reprinted in with the help of original edition published long back []. This book is Printed in black & white, sewing binding. Teotihuacan / t eɪ ˌ oʊ t iː w ə ˈ k ɑː n / (Spanish: Teotihuacán) (Spanish pronunciation: [teotiwa'kan] (), (modern Nahuatl pronunciation (help info)) is an ancient Mesoamerican city located in a sub-valley of the Valley of Mexico, which is located in the State of Mexico, 40 kilometres (25 mi) northeast of modern-day Mexico uacan is known today as the site of many of.

A few miles northeast of Mexico City stands the ancient site of Teotihuacan, the largest city in Mesoamerica during Pre-Columbian times. Orthodox archaeologists are divided concerning the dating of the site, some believing it flourished from to BC, and others stating a .   Beginning in about B.C., a great city developed in the fertile Teotihuacan (Nahuatl spelling) Valley some 25 miles northeast of what is now downtown Mexico City. Before long it was the largest city in ancient America with , to , residents occupying more than square miles. Teotihuacan is a UNESCO world heritage site, located in highland central Mexico, about twenty-five miles from Mexico City, visited by millions of tourists every year. The book begins with Cuicuilco, a predecessor that arose around BCE, then traces Teotihuacan from its founding in approximately BCE to its collapse around CE. First comprehensive English-language book on the largest city in the Americas before the s. Teotihuacan is a UNESCO world heritage site, located in highland central Mexico, about twenty-five.

Teotihuacan. Teotihuacan was one of the most remarkable cities of the ancient world. Today it's located 48km/30mi NE of Mexico City, and considered to be one of the world's great archaeological sites. In its day, it was massive, densely populated, and well organized. Valley of Mexico works Search for books with subject Valley of Mexico. Search. Check Availability. Check Availability. Post-conquest developments in the Teotihuacan Valley, Mexico Pamela J. Cressey Not in Library. Christo-paganism William Madsen. This paper addresses the timing of accelerated soil erosion and landscape degradation in central Mexico. It shows data on erosion sequences in the Valley of Teotihuacan, an area where agricultural dates back to at least since BCE, and an ideal setting to test ideas on the effect of preconquest versus post-conquest anthropogenic impacts on the environment. Teotihuacán, (Nahuatl: “The City of the Gods”) the most important and largest city of pre-Aztec central Mexico, located about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of modern Mexico City. At its apogee (c. ce), it encompassed some 8 square miles (20 square km) and supported a population estimated at ,–,, making it, at the time, one.